Coté Escrivá Brings The Human Experience To The Surface With Bold Art and Three Dimensional Sculptures

Coté Escrivá "Untitled" Acrylic on Canvas. 2017. Image © Nonsuch Editions.
Coté Escrivá "Untitled" Acrylic on Canvas. 2017. Image © Nonsuch Editions.

Coté Escrivá Brings The Human Experience To The Surface With Bold Art and Three Dimensional Sculptures

While we might not play as adults as we did when we were children, our imaginations remain just as vital. In fact, with a lifetime of experience under our belts, our inner creative landscapes become nuanced, complex, and intricately flavored – as we discover when we take the time to connect with them. No doubt, this is why contemporary art enthusiasts find three dimensional sculptures so captivating to view and collect. Within the realm of three dimensional sculptures – especially those that touch on something deeper within the viewer – few create so masterfully as Spanish artist Coté Escrivá. Drawing from a vivid pool of pop culture and street art, Escrivá’s creations resonate internationally. Boldness and vulnerability collide in design pieces that are as iconic as they are collectible.

The Artist, And Ourselves

Escrivá was born in Valencia in 1982, and the motifs of his generation can be easily discovered within his work. After studying industrial design at the Polytechnic University of Valencia, and launching a burgeoning design career within the advertising industry, Escrivá began to focus more intent on his illustrations – allowing the unique universe that his brand denotes to take shape. So began a practice of the assimilation of beloved characters – think Mickey Mouse, Goofy, Snoopy, Popeye, Garfield, and Odie to name but a few – and the regurgitation of something more raw. Something laced with empathy, struggle, and a charge of modernity.

Coté Escrivá’s creations always bring some element of the inside outwards. Bones are revealed, while eyes often appear as dark portals to what lies within. The impact varies from disquieting to endearing, as we – the beholder – experience perhaps our own inner child revealed, or even more so, the battle-scarred but ever-present touch of our adult capacity to imagine beginning to stir. This resonance quickly earned Escrivá acclaim, and a global array of art exhibitions followed, alongside an impressive real of magazine features. Most recently fans follow Escrivá’s Creepy series, including Creepy Mickey, Creepy Goofy, Creepy Snoopy, Creepy Popeye, and Creepy Brutus. Meanwhile, Escrivá maintains a toe in the world of street culture, adorning skate decks just as readily as he fills art galleries.

Entering The World Of Three Dimensional Sculptures

Coté Escrivá’s mode of working begins with putting pencil to paper. Next, a graphic tablet facilitates the bringing to life of his hybrid characters. In what may be considered the inevitable next step for such naturally iconic entities, Escrivá partnered with Hong Kong brand Thunder Mates in 2017. Now, his characters could leap off the screen into full 3D form. Limited edition polyresin three dimensional sculptures enabled the world’s art collectors to own a sample of Escrivá’s world in an entirely new way. The characters lend perfectly to an extra dimension, with their emotive poses unleashing far greater impact – such as that possessed by Escrivá’s Creepy Badass or his Jumbo Mono Creepy Monkey sculpture that stands 70cm tall.  Escrivá’s Thunder Mates collaborations quickly found a hungry audience, and status as highly sought after collectibles.

Coté Escrivá "Jumbo Mono Creepy Monkey," Polyresin. 2020. Image © Nonsuch Editions.
Coté Escrivá "Jumbo Mono Creepy Monkey," Polyresin. 2020. Image © Nonsuch Editions.

Commentary On Contemporary Living

As art culture becomes global, trends permeate international borders, and the lines between pop culture and fine art become ever more blurred. The three dimensional sculptures tradition, very much rooted in East Asian cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo, continues to cast wider and wider in scope and popularity, embracing artists on every continent. Meanwhile, for Escrivá, the global appeal of adored cartoon characters similarly transcends cultural divide – creating a visual language that needs no translation. And so, he joins the ranks of other Spanish artists touching the world with a contemporary reflection of the human experience. With Javier Calleja, he shares common grounds in marrying the innocent with the unabashed. In pulling the digital back into the tactile realm, he joins Barcelona artist Emilio Garcia, who wanted to create tangible art within a sea of digitization. In international icon creation, he joins El Pez, whose work can similarly be found in many a far-flung corner. “Pez” translates as “fish” in Spanish, and indeed, his cheery fish characters are just as instantly recognizable as Escrivá’s re-imagined childhood heroes. Each artist reveals something of themselves, as they teach us a great deal about our own inner experience. To achieve so much with such deft simplicity is a feat indeed.